Fordham Conversations
Tapping into the Fordham University community to discuss and uncover issues that impact our world near and far.

What can the autobiography of an 18th century ex-slave teach us about self-reliance?  John Bugg talks about the Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano.  Then, Fr. Terrance Klein fleshes out what he means when he says the soul itself is narrative. 

Direct download: FOCON091114.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:00 AM

This week Chris Williams talks to people who, in one way or another, have gone back to college. Cira Vernazza, director of Fordham University's College at 60 program, talks about how the university has special classes designed for people 60 and older. Three of the students in the program (Judy Bowman, Timothy Kiehn, and Peg Smith-Loeb) discuss the benefits of taking college courses after retirement. Then, Taylor Harris talks about moving back to her alma mater and her McSweeney's column "Big Mom on Campus: Raising 2 Kids in a College Dorm." 

Direct download: FC061513.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:44 PM

This week, we're talking about comedy with members of Fordham Experimental Theater. Ryan Creamer, Amanda Pell, and Jeff Sharkey tell us what it's like to perform comedy, what makes them laugh, and their different styles. Several FET students produced a comedy show "Do You Get It?" that's currently airing on the Manhattan Neighborhood Network.

Direct download: FC090614.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:00 PM

Often we hear that beauty comes from within, but it turns out the way you look can affect how other people react to you, for better and for worse. Daniel Hamermesh, author of Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful, dissects how attractive people fare better economically. Then, Fordham professors Laura Gonzalez and Yuliya Komarova talk about their research with online social lending and why being more attractive could hurt when it comes to securing a loan. 

Direct download: FC083014.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:57 PM

Sexist? Formulaic? Harmless guilty pleasure? What are your assumptions about romance novels? On this week's show we're digging into the stereotypes and critiques of the romance genre. Author Eloisa James weighs in and talks about how the tides are changing for writers and readers in the genre. 

Direct download: RomanceWrirtersFinal.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:00 PM

This week’s show is all about food and how it’s more than just a source of energy. Food can shape our bodies, identity, and culture. Jonathon Appels teaches a class at Fordham called ‘You Are What You Eat: The Anthropology of Food.’ He talks about the lack of discourse around food culture, and his own experience with food. Also, Emma Boast (program director at the Museum of Food and Drink) talks about a project aimed at opening a museum dedicated to food in New York City.

Direct download: FC081614.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:00 PM

This week on Fordham Conversations we look at Ecology in the Concrete Jungle. Fordham Ecology graduate student William Haffey talks about  testing the effectiveness of bird friendly glass.  Urban Ecologist and Fordham PhD Candidate Jason Aloisio discusses why City's are usually warmer than other areas and how to decrease your carbon footprint.

Direct download: FC08092014.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:00 AM

This week’s show tackles some of life’s big questions (Why are we here? Where do we go when we die?) by looking at three different systems of knowledge (magic, science, and religion). Katia Yuguis is a doctoral student in the Sociology/Anthropology department at Fordham University. She teaches a class called “Magic, Science, and Religion” and discusses why all three are important, and why we shouldn’t be dismissive of any one of them.

Direct download: FC080214.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 4:00 PM

This week on Fordham Conversations we hear from Human Rights attorney Almudena Bernabeu. She has prosecuted some of the worst perpetrators of crimes against humanity as an International Attorney and Transitional Justice Program Director for The Center for Justice and Accountability. Almudena was also in the documentary How To Nail A Dictator and was on Time Magazine's list of the 100 Most Influential People. 

Direct download: FC072614.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:00 AM

New York Harbor has a long history that starts way back in the 1600s. It’s home to all kinds of species and wildlife, but throughout the 19th and 20th centuries the harbor was filled with trash and sewage sending the harbor on a downward trajectory. But now, it’s making a comeback and things are looking better. Today on the show we’re talking to John Waldman. He’s the author of Heartbeats in the Muck: The History, Sea Life, and Environment of New York Harbor which is now available from Fordham University Press. Also on the show, WFUV's Kris Venezia has a story about how New York's waterways can be used for transportation. 

Direct download: FC071914.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:00 AM